Antitrust

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DEFINITION of 'Antitrust'

The antitrust laws apply to virtually all industries and to every level of business, including manufacturing, transportation, distribution, and marketing. They prohibit a variety of practices that restrain trade.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Antitrust'

Examples of illegal practices are price-fixing conspiracies, corporate mergers likely to reduce the competitive vigor of particular markets, and predatory acts designed to achieve or maintain monopoly power.

Microsoft, ATT, and J.D. Rockefeller Oil are companies who have been convicted of antitrust practices.

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