Antitrust

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DEFINITION of 'Antitrust'

The antitrust laws apply to virtually all industries and to every level of business, including manufacturing, transportation, distribution, and marketing. They prohibit a variety of practices that restrain trade.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Antitrust'

Examples of illegal practices are price-fixing conspiracies, corporate mergers likely to reduce the competitive vigor of particular markets, and predatory acts designed to achieve or maintain monopoly power.

Microsoft, ATT, and J.D. Rockefeller Oil are companies who have been convicted of antitrust practices.

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RELATED FAQS
  1. What companies have been targeted for anti-trust action in the 21st century?

    Several major and well known companies have been targeted for possible antitrust action in the last decade. Antitrust laws ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. Are there any legal monopolies in America or Europe?

    There are legal monopolies in almost every country, but their numbers are declining. For several decades the political climate ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. Why are oligopolies legal while monopolies are not?

    Unless it can be proven that a company has attempted to restrain trade, both oligopolies and monopolies are legal in the ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. How did Dow Chemical defeat an international monopoly in the 1900s?

    Herbert Henry Dow, a Canadian by birth, was a remarkable man. A chemist and an entrepreneur, Dow was one of the first people ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. Why was Microsoft subject to antitrust charges in 1998?

    On May 18, 1998, the Department of Justice filed antitrust charges against Microsoft (Nasdaq:MSFT ). The charges were brought ... Read Full Answer >>
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