Associate In Premium Auditing - APA

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DEFINITION of 'Associate In Premium Auditing - APA'

Professional designation awarded by the Insurance Institute of America (IIA). An Associate in Premium Accounting will have comprehensive education in insurance contracts, auditing procedures, principles of insurance accounting, casualty insurance company accounting and the relationship of premium auditing to other insurance operations.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Associate In Premium Auditing - APA'

The Associate in Premium Auditing (APA) designation is intended for those professionals who are required to perform premium audits in an organized and professional manner. An APA is a CPA whose specialty is the insurance industry.

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