Associate In Premium Auditing - APA


DEFINITION of 'Associate In Premium Auditing - APA'

Professional designation awarded by the Insurance Institute of America (IIA). An Associate in Premium Accounting will have comprehensive education in insurance contracts, auditing procedures, principles of insurance accounting, casualty insurance company accounting and the relationship of premium auditing to other insurance operations.

BREAKING DOWN 'Associate In Premium Auditing - APA'

The Associate in Premium Auditing (APA) designation is intended for those professionals who are required to perform premium audits in an organized and professional manner. An APA is a CPA whose specialty is the insurance industry.

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  1. Do dividends affect working capital?

    Regardless of whether cash dividends are paid or accrued, a company's working capital is reduced. When cash dividends are ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. Do prepayments provide working capital?

    Prepayments, or prepaid expenses, are typically included in the current assets on a company's balance sheet, as they represent ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. Does working capital include salaries?

    A company accrues unpaid salaries on its balance sheet as part of accounts payable, which is a current liability account, ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What is the difference between a peril and a hazard?

    The two related terms "peril" and "hazard" are often used in reference to the insurance industry. Essentially, a peril is ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What is a profit and loss (P&L) statement and why do companies publish them?

    A profit and loss (P&L) statement, or balance sheet, is essentially a snapshot of a company's financial activity for ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. How do dividends affect the balance sheet?

    Dividends paid in cash affect a company's balance sheet by decreasing the company's cash account on the asset side and decreasing ... Read Full Answer >>

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