Asian Productivity Organization - APO

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DEFINITION of 'Asian Productivity Organization - APO'

A union of 20 Asian countries formed in 1961 to promote socioeconomic development among its members. The members of the Asian Productivity Organization are Bangladesh, Cambodia, China, Fiji, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Iran, Japan, Korea, Laos, Malaysia, Mongolia, Nepal, Pakistan, the Philippines, Singapore, Sri Lanka, Thailand and Vietnam.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Asian Productivity Organization - APO'

The APO's roles include researching the needs of member countries. promoting economic alliances among members, building relations between member countries and non-member countries, developing methods for member countries to increase their productivity and competitiveness, strengthening national productivity organizations in member countries, and facilitating information exchange among member countries. It is also concerned with helping member countries to become knowledge-based economies, promoting sustainable (green) development and helping small and medium-sized business to become more competitive.

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