Appellate Courts

DEFINITION of 'Appellate Courts'

The part of the judicial system that is responsible for hearing and reviewing appeals from legal cases that have already been heard in a trial-level or other lower court. Persons or entities such as corporations having an unsuccessful outcome in a trial-level or other lower court may file an appeal with an appellate court to have the decision reviewed. Appellate courts are present at the state and federal levels.

BREAKING DOWN 'Appellate Courts'

Appellate courts exist as part of the judicial system to provide those who have judgments made against them an opportunity to have their case reviewed. A corporation with an unfavorable judgment against them will likely see a drop in share price but an appeal could overturn this previous ruling. If an appeal is successful, the stock price usually jumps.


Courts at the appellate level review the findings and evidence from the lower court and determine if there is sufficient evidence to support the determination made by the lower court. In addition, the appellate court will determine if the trial or lower court correctly applied the law. The highest form of an appellate court in the United States is the United States Supreme Court which hears only appeals of major importance and consequence.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Appeal Bond

    An amount of money placed in holding while the appeal is being ...
  2. Bail Bond

    A written promise signed by a defendant and surety to ensure ...
  3. Stare Decisis

    A Latin term meaning "to stand by that which is decided". Stare ...
  4. Tort Law

    The area of law that covers the majority of all civil lawsuits. ...
  5. Admiralty Court

    Any court governed by admiralty law, whether the court is officially ...
  6. Judgment

    A court order to the loser of a lawsuit to pay the winner a specified ...
Related Articles
  1. Entrepreneurship

    Don't Get Sued: 5 Tips To Protect Your Small Business

    Find out what you can do to limit risk and keep your business running smoothly.
  2. Home & Auto

    Cover Your Company With Liability Insurance

    Every business is susceptible to legal action. Find out how to protect yours.
  3. Home & Auto

    It's Raining Lawsuits: Do You Need An Umbrella Policy?

    This type of insurance protects your assets and future wages against lawsuits. Find out if it might benefit you.
  4. Personal Finance

    Litigation: Are Your Investments At Risk?

    Don't let company lawsuits hit you unprepared. Learn how to uncover how they might affect you.
  5. Options & Futures

    The Foundation Of Structured Settlements

    This annuitized payment setup should be arranged through impartial attorneys and tax agents.
  6. Home & Auto

    Protect Your Company From Employee Lawsuits

    Understanding employment practices liability insurance is easy, once you know the basics.
  7. Economics

    Obama’s Final Gesture to Expand Retirement

    President Obama has announced that the 2017 congressional budget will feature an attempt to expand access to qualified retirement savings accounts for workers.
  8. Economics

    Explaining Statute Of Limitations

    A statute of limitations sets the maximum time that parties have to initiate legal proceedings from the date an alleged offense occurred.
  9. Personal Finance

    4 Famous People Whose Finances Were Under Conservatorship

    Understand what conservatorship is and how it comes about during the legal process. Learn about four celebrities who were placed under conservatorship.
  10. Investing Basics

    How To Handle A Serious Dispute With Your Broker

    Find out what to do if you have a dispute with your broker.
RELATED FAQS
  1. What is the difference between legal liability and public liability?

    When you see the term "public liability" attached to a business, its products or its services, it refers to a specific type ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What kinds of financial instruments are designated as “Securities” by Cabinet Order?

    In Japan, securities are regulated by the Diet and the Financial Services Agency, or FSA. Rulings about securities come down ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. What's the difference between cash-on-delivery differ and delivery against payment?

    Cash on delivery and delivery versus payment describe different procedures and timing of payments. Cash on delivery describes ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What are the different ways I can file my income tax return?

    In contractual law, a letter of intent is a document that represents an agreement between parties before the final agreement ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. How are corporate poison pills regulated in the United States?

    The Delaware Supreme Court was the first legal authority to declare poison pills a valid initiative. This defense is either ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. How legally binding is a letter of intent?

    A signatory may be bound to a letter of intent depending on how the letter is drafted. In a business-to-business transaction, ... Read Full Answer >>
Hot Definitions
  1. Black Swan

    An event or occurrence that deviates beyond what is normally expected of a situation and that would be extremely difficult ...
  2. Inverted Yield Curve

    An interest rate environment in which long-term debt instruments have a lower yield than short-term debt instruments of the ...
  3. Socially Responsible Investment - SRI

    An investment that is considered socially responsible because of the nature of the business the company conducts. Common ...
  4. Presidential Election Cycle (Theory)

    A theory developed by Yale Hirsch that states that U.S. stock markets are weakest in the year following the election of a ...
  5. Super Bowl Indicator

    An indicator based on the belief that a Super Bowl win for a team from the old AFL (AFC division) foretells a decline in ...
Trading Center