Appraisal Capital

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DEFINITION of 'Appraisal Capital'

A form of accounting adjustment. Appraisal capital is created when the appraised value of a company's asset exceeds its book value. The difference between the two values is debited against the actual asset and then credited to an equity account belonging to the stockholders.

BREAKING DOWN 'Appraisal Capital'

Appraisal capital is quite rarely seen in the United States and is much more commonly done in other countries as a form of writeup. The excess value created by the appraisal is what creates the actual capital involved.

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