Adjustable-Rate Mortgage - ARM

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Adjustable-Rate Mortgage - ARM'

A type of mortgage in which the interest rate paid on the outstanding balance varies according to a specific benchmark. The initial interest rate is normally fixed for a period of time after which it is reset periodically, often every month. The interest rate paid by the borrower will be based on a benchmark plus an additional spread, called an ARM margin.

An adjustable rate mortgage is also known as a "variable-rate mortgage" or a "floating-rate mortgage".

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Adjustable-Rate Mortgage - ARM'

Both 2/28 and 3/27 mortgages are examples of ARMs. A 2/28 mortgage's initial interest rate is fixed for a period of two years and then resets to a floating rate for the remaining 28 years of the mortgage. A 3/27 mortgage is typically the same as a 2/28 mortgage, except that the interest rate is fixed for three years and then floats for the remaining 27 years of the mortgage.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Annual Cap

    A clause found in the contract of an adjustable-rate mortgage ...
  2. 2/28 Adjustable-Rate Mortgage - ...

    A type of adjustable-rate mortgage that has a two-year fixed ...
  3. Lifetime Cap

    The maximum interest rate on an adjustable-rate mortgage (ARM) ...
  4. Interest Rate Ceiling

    The maximum interest rate that a financial institution can charge ...
  5. Floater

    A bond or other type of debt whose coupon rate changes with market ...
  6. 3/27 Adjustable-Rate Mortgage - ...

    A type of adjustable-rate mortgage (ARM) frequently offered to ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. Were collateralized mortgage obligations (CMOs) responsible for the financial crisis ...

    Many believe that collateralized mortgage obligations (CMOs) played a critical role in the 2008 financial crisis. Subprime ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. Can small investors buy collateralized mortgage obligations (CMOs)?

    Collateralized mortgage obligations (CMOs), which are pools of mortgage-backed securities (MBS), are available to smaller ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. What is the difference between an option-adjusted spread and a Z-spread in reference ...

    Unlike the Z-spread calculation, the option-adjusted spread takes into account how the embedded option in a bond can change ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What are some historical examples of debt securitization?

    The first debt securities were probably sovereign debt assets that were transferred from the British government to mercantilist ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What price-to-book ratio is considered average in the chemicals sector?

    You can use Microsoft Excel to calculate the loan-to-value ratio if you have the mortgage amount and appraised value of a ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. How can I use the correlation coefficient to predict returns in the stock market?

    Simple interest is most commonly seen in short-term loans, such as those from payday lenders or pawn shops. You might see ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Insurance

    ARMed And Dangerous

    In a climate of rising interest rates, having an adjustable-rate mortgage can be risky.
  2. Credit & Loans

    Mortgages: Fixed-Rate Versus Adjustable-Rate

    Both of these have advantages and disadvantages depending on your financial needs and prospects.
  3. Personal Finance

    Understanding Your Mortgage

    We walk through the steps needed to secure the best loan to finance the purchase of your home.
  4. Options & Futures

    Make A Risk-Based Mortgage Decision

    Find out how to choose which mortgage style is right for you.
  5. Home & Auto

    5 Risky Mortgage Types To Avoid

    There are plenty of ways to end up with a bad mortgage. The risks of these five should make every homebuyer think twice before signing.
  6. Home & Auto

    Adjustable-Rate Mortgage Indexes: Know Your Benchmark

    Understanding these benchmarks can help you select the most competitive adjustable-rate loan.
  7. Home & Auto

    Option ARMs: American Dream Or Mortgage Nightmare?

    Option adjustable rate mortgages could make or break your home-buying experience.
  8. Investing Basics

    Subprime Lending: Helping Hand Or Underhanded?

    These loans can spell disaster for borrowers, but that doesn't mean they should be condemned.
  9. Home & Auto

    What Are The Tax Advantages Of Buying A Home?

    Don't forget these deductions and credits that homeowners can use to reduce their tax bill.
  10. Credit & Loans

    How To Finance Foreign Real Estate

    If you don't pay cash, financing real estate abroad is likely to cost more than at home. Watch for local laws and be sure your rights are protected.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Covered Call

    An options strategy whereby an investor holds a long position in an asset and writes (sells) call options on that same asset ...
  2. Butterfly Spread

    A neutral option strategy combining bull and bear spreads. Butterfly spreads use four option contracts with the same expiration ...
  3. Unlevered Beta

    A type of metric that compares the risk of an unlevered company to the risk of the market. The unlevered beta is the beta ...
  4. Moving Average - MA

    A widely used indicator in technical analysis that helps smooth out price action by filtering out the “noise” from random ...
  5. Yield Curve

    A line that plots the interest rates, at a set point in time, of bonds having equal credit quality, but differing maturity ...
  6. Productivity

    An economic measure of output per unit of input. Inputs include labor and capital, while output is typically measured in ...
Trading Center