ARM Margin

DEFINITION of 'ARM Margin'

A fixed percentage rate that is added to an index value to determine the fully indexed interest rate of an adjustable rate mortgage (ARM). The margin is constant throughout the life of the mortgage, while the index value is variable. For example, the index might be the prime rate, which varies according to market conditions, and the margin might be 2%. If the prime rate were 5% and the margin 2%, then the fully indexed interest rate would be 7%. If the prime rate rises to 6% (the margin remains constant), the fully indexed interest rate would be 8%.

BREAKING DOWN 'ARM Margin'

An ARM's margin is a very important and often overlooked part of the loan's interest rate. The margin is frequently negotiable with the lender. Different margins should be expected with different indexes as various popular indexes differ in their historical values relative to each other. In other words, the lower the index level, the higher the expected margin. When various index/margin options are available to a borrower, an analysis should be performed to determine which is the most economical.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Margin

    1. Borrowed money that is used to purchase securities. This practice ...
  2. Mortgage Index

    The benchmark interest rate an adjustable-rate mortgage's fully ...
  3. Prime Rate

    The interest rate that commercial banks charge their most credit-worthy ...
  4. Interest Rate

    The amount charged, expressed as a percentage of principal, by ...
  5. 2/28 Adjustable-Rate Mortgage - ...

    A type of adjustable-rate mortgage that has a two-year fixed ...
  6. Adjustable-Rate Mortgage - ARM

    A type of mortgage in which the interest rate paid on the outstanding ...
Related Articles
  1. Insurance

    ARMed And Dangerous

    In a climate of rising interest rates, having an adjustable-rate mortgage can be risky.
  2. Credit & Loans

    Mortgages: Fixed-Rate Versus Adjustable-Rate

    Both of these have advantages and disadvantages depending on your financial needs and prospects.
  3. Credit & Loans

    Understanding The Mortgage Payment Structure

    We explain the calculation and payment process as well as the amortization schedule of home loans.
  4. Options & Futures

    4 Equity Derivatives And How They Work

    Equity derivatives offer retail investors opportunities to benefit from an underlying security without owning the security itself.
  5. Options & Futures

    Five Advantages of Futures Over Options

    Futures have a number of advantages over options such as fixed upfront trading costs, lack of time decay and liquidity.
  6. Term

    What is Pegging?

    Pegging refers to the practice of fixing one country's currency to that of another country. It also describes a practice in which investors avoid purchasing security shares underlying a put option.
  7. Home & Auto

    Understanding Pre-Qualification Vs. Pre-Approval

    Contrary to popular belief, being pre-qualified for a mortgage doesn’t mean you’re pre-approved for a home loan.
  8. Investing Basics

    An Introduction To Structured Products

    Structured products take a traditional security and replace its usual payment features with a non-traditional payoff.
  9. Options & Futures

    Contango Versus Normal Backwardation

    It’s important for both hedgers and speculators to know whether the commodity futures markets are in contango or normal backwardation.
  10. Home & Auto

    6 Reasons To Avoid Private Mortgage Insurance

    Homebuyers who put less than 20% down will likely be forced to secure private mortgage insurance. Here are six reasons to avoid it.
RELATED FAQS
  1. What is the difference between a 2/28 and a 3/27 ARM?

    An adjustable rate mortgage (ARM) is a type of mortgage that has a fixed interest rate for a certain time period at the beginning ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What is a derivative?

    A derivative is a contract between two or more parties whose value is based on an agreed-upon underlying financial asset, ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. What is after-hours trading? Am I able to trade at this time?

    After-hours trading (AHT) refers to the buying and selling of securities on major exchanges outside of specified regular ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. Do FHA loans require escrow accounts?

    Federal Housing Administration (FHA) loans require escrow accounts for property taxes, homeowners insurance and mortgage ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. Do FHA loans have prepayment penalties?

    Unlike subprime mortgages issued by some conventional commercial lenders, Federal Housing Administration (FHA) loans do not ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. Can FHA loans be refinanced?

    Federal Housing Administration (FHA) loans can be refinanced in several ways. According to the U.S. Department of Housing ... Read Full Answer >>
Hot Definitions
  1. Discouraged Worker

    A person who is eligible for employment and is able to work, but is currently unemployed and has not attempted to find employment ...
  2. Ponzimonium

    After Bernard Madoff's $65 billion Ponzi scheme was revealed, many new (smaller-scale) Ponzi schemers became exposed. Ponzimonium ...
  3. Quarterly Earnings Report

    A quarterly filing made by public companies to report their performance. Included in earnings reports are items such as net ...
  4. Dark Pool Liquidity

    The trading volume created by institutional orders that are unavailable to the public. The bulk of dark pool liquidity is ...
  5. Godfather Offer

    An irrefutable takeover offer made to a target company by an acquiring company. Typically, the acquisition price's premium ...
Trading Center