Accounting Rate of Return - ARR

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DEFINITION of 'Accounting Rate of Return - ARR'

The amount of profit, or return, that an individual can expect based on an investment made. Accounting rate of return divides the average profit by the initial investment in order to get the ratio or return that can be expected. This allows an investor or business owner to easily compare the profit potential for projects, products and investments.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Accounting Rate of Return - ARR'

ARR is considered a straight-line method of gathering quantitative information. While this is a positive measure in some aspects, its lack of sophistication is also a drawback. ARR does not consider the time value of money, which means that returns taken in during later years may be worth less than those taken in now, and does not consider cash flows, which can be an integral part of maintaining a business.

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