Articles Of Association

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DEFINITION of 'Articles Of Association'

A document that specifies the regulations for a company's operations. The articles of association define the company's purpose and lays out how tasks are to be accomplished within the organization, including the process for appointing directors and how financial records will be handled.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Articles Of Association'

Articles of association often identify the manner in which a company will issue stock shares, pay dividends and audit financial records and power of voting rights. This set of rules can be considered a user's manual for the company because they outline the methodology for accomplishing the day-to-day tasks that must be completed.

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