Ascending Triangle


DEFINITION of 'Ascending Triangle'

A bullish chart pattern used in technical analysis that is easily recognizable by the distinct shape created by two trendlines. In an ascending triangle, one trendline is drawn horizontally at a level that has historically prevented the price from heading higher, while the second trendline connects a series of increasing troughs. Traders enter into long positions when the price of the asset breaks above the top resistance. The chart below is an example of an ascending triangle:

Ascending Triangle

BREAKING DOWN 'Ascending Triangle'

An ascending triangle is generally considered to be a continuation pattern, meaning that it is usually found amid a period of consolidation within an uptrend. Once the breakout occurs, buyers will aggressively send the price of the asset higher, usually on high volume. The most common price target is generally set to be equal to the entry price plus the vertical height of the triangle.

An ascending triangle is the bullish counterpart of a descending triangle.

  1. Bull

    An investor who thinks the market, a specific security or an ...
  2. Resistance (Resistance Level)

    A chart point or range that caps an increase in the level of ...
  3. Triangle

    A technical analysis pattern created by drawing trendlines along ...
  4. Long (or Long Position)

    1. The buying of a security such as a stock, commodity or currency, ...
  5. Breakout

    A price movement through an identified level of support or resistance, ...
  6. Technical Analysis

    A method of evaluating securities by analyzing statistics generated ...
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  1. How do I find stocks developing ascending triangle patterns?

    Ascending triangles are commonly occurring bullish continuation patterns. Traders look for stocks that exhibit ascending ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What trading opportunities does an ascending triangle offer?

    An ascending triangle is a chart pattern that is usually considered a continuation pattern signaling the market is preparing ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. Where do traders place orders when they identify ascending triangles?

    An ascending triangle is usually considered a continuation pattern that occurs within an uptrend, although it can sometimes ... Read Full Answer >>
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    A company's working capital ratio can be too high in the sense that an excessively high ratio is generally considered an ... Read Full Answer >>
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    The doji candlestick is important enough that Steve Nison devotes an entire chapter to it in his definitive work on candlestick ... Read Full Answer >>
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