Accumulative Swing Index - ASI


DEFINITION of 'Accumulative Swing Index - ASI'

A indicator used by traders to gauge a security's long-term trend by comparing bars which contain its opening, closing, high and low prices throughout a specific period of time. When the ASI is positive, it suggests that the long-term trend will be higher, and when the ASI is negative, it suggests that the long-term trend will be lower.

The ASI is often cited as being developed by Welles Wilder.

BREAKING DOWN 'Accumulative Swing Index - ASI'

While the ASI is most often used for futures trading, it can be used for analyzing the price trends of other assets as well. The ASI may be used in conjunction with price charts in order to confirm trendline breakouts, because the same trendline would be penetrated in both situations.

  1. Indicator

    Indicators are statistics used to measure current conditions ...
  2. Trendline

    A line that is drawn over pivot highs or under pivot lows to ...
  3. Breakout

    A price movement through an identified level of support or resistance, ...
  4. Technical Analysis

    A method of evaluating securities by analyzing statistics generated ...
  5. Technical Indicator

    Any class of metrics whose value is derived from generic price ...
  6. MACD Technical Indicator

    Moving Average Convergence Divergence (or MACD) is a trend-following ...
Related Articles
  1. Trading Strategies

    Momentum And The Relative Strength Index

    These two indicators can give the trader a better understanding of when to get in and out of an issue.
  2. Active Trading

    Accumulative Swing Index And The McClellan Oscillator

    These indicators serve as confirmation for those of us who need to double check our findings on a regular basis.
  3. Trading Strategies

    Basics Of Technical Analysis

    Learn how chartists analyze the price movements of the market. We'll introduce you to the most important concepts in this approach.
  4. Technical Indicators

    Explaining Autocorrelation

    Autocorrelation is the measure of an internal correlation with a given time series.
  5. Chart Advisor

    ChartAdvisor for October 9 2015

    Weekly technical summary of the major U.S. indexes.
  6. Chart Advisor

    These Oil & Gas Stocks Have Reversed

    It's been a long downtrend for oil stock owners, but there's hope. These four oil and gas stocks have reversed and may keep trending to the upside.
  7. Chart Advisor

    4 European Stocks to Consider Buying

    European companies, listed on US exchanges, that are providing buying opportunities right now.
  8. Investing Basics

    What Does Plain Vanilla Mean?

    Plain vanilla is a term used in investing to describe the most basic types of financial instruments.
  9. Chart Advisor

    ChartAdvisor for October 2 2015

    Weekly technical summary of the major U.S. indexes.
  10. Investing

    How Diversifying Can Help You Manage Market Mayhem

    The recent market volatility, while not unexpected, has certainly been hard for any investor to digest.
  1. How is the Accumulative Swing Index calculated?

    The accumulative swing index was created and defined by J. Welles Wilder in "New Concepts in Technical Trading Systems" published ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. Can mutual funds invest in options and futures?

    Mutual funds invest in not only stocks and fixed-income securities but also options and futures. There exists a separate ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. What are some of the most common technical indicators that back up Doji patterns?

    The doji candlestick is important enough that Steve Nison devotes an entire chapter to it in his definitive work on candlestick ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. Tame Panic Selling with the Exhausted Selling Model

    The exhausted selling model is a pricing strategy used to identify and trade based off of the price floor of a security. ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. Point and Figure Charting Using Count Analysis

    Count analysis is a means of interpreting point and figure charts to measure vertical price movements. Technical analysts ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What assumptions are made when conducting a t-test?

    The common assumptions made when doing a t-test include those regarding the scale of measurement, random sampling, normality ... Read Full Answer >>

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Purchasing Power

    The value of a currency expressed in terms of the amount of goods or services that one unit of money can buy. Purchasing ...
  2. Real Estate Investment Trust - REIT

    A REIT is a type of security that invests in real estate through property or mortgages and often trades on major exchanges ...
  3. Section 1231 Property

    A tax term relating to depreciable business property that has been held for over a year. Section 1231 property includes buildings, ...
  4. Term Deposit

    A deposit held at a financial institution that has a fixed term, and guarantees return of principal.
  5. Zero-Sum Game

    A situation in which one person’s gain is equivalent to another’s loss, so that the net change in wealth or benefit is zero. ...
  6. Capitalization Rate

    The rate of return on a real estate investment property based on the income that the property is expected to generate.
Trading Center
You are using adblocking software

Want access to all of Investopedia? Add us to your “whitelist”
so you'll never miss a feature!