Asian Century

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Asian Century'

The dominant role that could be played by Asia in the 21st century, because of its growing economic clout and global demographic trends. "Asian Century" as a theme, has gained credence following the rapid economic growth of China and India since the 1980s, which has propelled them to the top ranks of the world's biggest economies. While the term is first believed to have been coined in the 1980s, it gained traction following the release of a report by the Asian Development Bank (ADB) in August 2011.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Asian Century'

According to the ADB report, if Asia continues on its recent growth trajectory, by 2050 its per capita income could rise six times in purchasing power parity terms to reach the present income levels of Europe. This rise in income would enable an additional 3 billion Asians to enjoy living standards of the affluent. The ADB report also states that with Asia on track to double its share of global GDP to 52% by 2050, the continent would regain the dominant economic position it held 300 years ago.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Brazil, Russia, India And China ...

    An acronym for the economies of Brazil, Russia, India and China ...
  2. China Investment Corporation - ...

    A government-sponsored entity of the People's Republic of China ...
  3. China Concepts Stock

    The stock of a company whose assets or earnings have significant ...
  4. India ETF

    An exchange-traded fund that is based on a basket of securities ...
  5. BRIC ETF

    An exchange-traded fund that invests in stocks and listed securities ...
  6. Emerging Market Economy

    A nation's economy that is progressing toward becoming advanced, ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. How can I create a yield curve in Excel?

    You can create a yield curve in Microsoft Excel if you are given the time to maturities of bonds and their respective yields ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What are the different formations of yield curves?

    There are three main different formations of yield curves: normal, inverted and flat yield curves. The yield curve describes ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. What does a large multiplier effect signify?

    The multiplier effect depends on banks' reserve requirements. In macroeconomics, if a country exhibits a large multiplier ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What is the criteria for a simple random sample?

    Simple random sampling is the most basic form of sampling and can be a component of more precise, more complex sampling methods. ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. How is money supply used in monetary policy?

    Regulating the money supply is the sole tool of the Federal Reserve's monetary policy. The Federal Reserve can affect the ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. Do any markets not exhibit asymmetric information?

    Asymmetric information, when interpreted literally, means that two parties to an economic transaction have different information ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Investing Basics

    Investing In China

    Investment opportunity is huge in China. However, investors should consider the pitfalls, understand the risks and rewards, focus on shareholder-friendly companies and stick to investments they ...
  2. Economics

    Introduction To Asian Financial Markets

    We look at the history of Asia's financial development and how investors can get involved in these growing markets.
  3. Forex Education

    Why China's Currency Tangos With The USD

    Investopedia explains: It takes two to tango, but unless both partners move in perfect cohesion, a sequence of graceful maneuvers can be reduced to a series of clumsy moves. The latter depiction ...
  4. Bonds & Fixed Income

    Dragons, Samurai Warriors And Sushi On Wall Street

    From samurai to sushi, there's no denying the East Asian influence on investing terminology.
  5. Investing Basics

    Why Country Funds Are So Risky

    High returns come at a price, but country funds may still be a good bet.
  6. Investing Basics

    What is a Nominal Value?

    The nominal value of a security, such as a stock or bond, remains fixed for the duration of its life.
  7. Economics

    Explaining the Human Development Index

    The Human Development Index (HDI) is a metric developed by the United Nations to take the emphasis off economic growth and focus on human wellbeing.
  8. Economics

    Gaining Market Influence-- The Case of US Shale

    A convergence of sustained bank financing, falling production costs and rising oil prices might position the US shale industry for a greater market role.
  9. Investing

    Why Some Investors Are Tilting Toward TIPS

    Last month’s five-year TIPS auction drew nearly $48 billion in interest, a sign of recent renewed demand for this inflation indexed asset among investors.
  10. Economics

    What is the International Monetary Fund?

    The International Monetary Fund fosters global monetary cooperation and sustainable economic growth.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Unlevered Beta

    A type of metric that compares the risk of an unlevered company to the risk of the market. The unlevered beta is the beta ...
  2. Moving Average - MA

    A widely used indicator in technical analysis that helps smooth out price action by filtering out the “noise” from random ...
  3. Yield Curve

    A line that plots the interest rates, at a set point in time, of bonds having equal credit quality, but differing maturity ...
  4. Productivity

    An economic measure of output per unit of input. Inputs include labor and capital, while output is typically measured in ...
  5. Variance

    The spread between numbers in a data set, measuring Variance is calculated by taking the differences between each number ...
  6. Terminal Value - TV

    The value of a bond at maturity, or of an asset at a specified, future valuation date, taking into account factors such as ...
Trading Center