Agricultural Sector Investment Program - ASIP

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DEFINITION of 'Agricultural Sector Investment Program - ASIP'

A World Bank program focused on agricultural development in Africa. The Agricultural Sector Investment Program's four primary goals are:

  1. Policy and institutional improvements to reform key areas of marketing, trade and pricing, food security and land use and tenure.
  2. Public investment to complement policy and institutional improvements.
  3. Private sector development to attract private dollars.
  4. The creation of a rural investment fund for small-scale capital investments in rural areas on a matching grant basis to support privatization of government farms.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Agricultural Sector Investment Program - ASIP'

The African countries of Zambia, Angola, Benin and Senegal participated in the ASIP program. The program is part of the World Bank's larger Millenium Development Goals (MDG), Corporate Advocacy Priorities (CAP) and Global Public Goods Priorities (GPG) programs.

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