Assay

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Assay'

The process of analyzing a physical sample to determine its composition. In financial markets, the term assay usually refers to the chemical analysis of a mineral or ore sample to ascertain its content of precious metals or minerals, such as gold, copper, or uranium. These samples are obtained from drill holes made in a mineral or ore body, or property that is being evaluated for its metal or mineral content by a resource exploration or production company.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Assay'

Since assay results provide an early indication of the potential value of a mineral or ore body, they are closely monitored by investors in junior resource companies, which are typically small-capitalization stocks. An exceptional assay result can trigger a substantial rally in the stock of a company that holds the mineral rights over the property. Conversely, poor assay results may lead to a significant decline in a stock that has run up on speculation about promising results.


In the futures markets, metals that are used to meet delivery requirements of futures contracts must be assayed to ensure that they meet the stringent quality and purity requirements mandated by the commodity futures exchange.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Futures Market

    An auction market in which participants buy and sell commodity/future ...
  2. Basis Grade

    The minimum accepted standard that a deliverable commodity must ...
  3. Precious Metals

    A classification of metals that are considered to be rare and/or ...
  4. Vault Receipt

    A document frequently used as a delivery instrument to indicate ...
  5. Underlying

    1. In derivatives, the security that must be delivered when a ...
  6. Futures Contract

    A contractual agreement, generally made on the trading floor ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. Why do companies enter into futures contracts?

    Different types of companies may enter into futures contracts for different purposes. The most common reason is to hedge ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What does a futures contract cost?

    The value of a futures contract is derived from the cash value of the underlying asset. While a futures contract may have ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. What are some of the more common types of regressions investors can use?

    The most common types of regression an investor can use are linear regressions and multiple linear regressions. Regressions ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What types of assets produce negative portfolio variance?

    Assets that have a negative correlation with each other produce negative portfolio variance. Variance is one measure of the ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. When is it better to use systematic over simple random sampling?

    Under simple random sampling, a sample of items is chosen randomly from a population, and each item has an equal probability ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What are some common financial sampling methods?

    There are two areas in finance where sampling is very important: hypothesis testing and auditing. The type of sampling methods ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Forex Education

    Commodity Prices And Currency Movements

    Find out which currencies are most affected by fluctuations in gold and oil prices, and improve your trading.
  2. Investing

    Using Technical Analysis In The Gold Markets

    The quest for this shiny commodity has made millionaires of paupers and, on the flip side, ruined many an investor.
  3. Economics

    Strike Gold With Junior Mining

    Learn what to watch out for to ensure your "sure thing" isn't another Bre-X.
  4. Insurance

    Futures Fundamentals

    For those who are new to futures but want a solid understanding of them, this tutorial explains what futures contracts are, how they work and why investors use them.
  5. Stock Analysis

    Southwest & Cheap Oil: The Perfect Combination?

    Discover how falling oil prices (and well-timed futures contracts) benefit Southwest Airlines.
  6. Economics

    Explaining the Liquidity Coverage Ratio

    The liquidity coverage ratio requires banks and other financial institutions to hold enough cash and liquid assets on hand to weather market stress.
  7. Fundamental Analysis

    Calculating Valuation

    Valuation is the process of determining what an asset is worth.
  8. Economics

    As Fed Prepares To Move, Gold Is Losing Its Luster

    Last week’s Semi-Annual Monetary Policy Report to Congress returned investors’ focus back to the fundamentals, and a general upbeat of the economy.
  9. Economics

    Will the Selloff in China Hurt the Global Economy?

    Though China is the world’s second largest economy, its volatility in the stock market is unlikely to have an impact on the global or Chinese economy.
  10. Fundamental Analysis

    Understanding Qualitative Analysis

    Qualitative analysis is a general term describing the non-mathematical scrutiny used by investors and managers to make investment and business decisions.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. OsMA

    An abbreviation for Oscillator - Moving Average. OsMA is used in technical analysis to represent the variance between an ...
  2. Investopedia

    One of the best-known sources of financial information on the internet. Investopedia is a resource for investors, consumers ...
  3. Unfair Claims Practice

    The improper avoidance of a claim by an insurer or an attempt to reduce the size of the claim. By engaging in unfair claims ...
  4. Killer Bees

    An individual or firm that helps a company fend off a takeover attempt. A killer bee uses defensive strategies to keep an ...
  5. Sin Tax

    A state-sponsored tax that is added to products or services that are seen as vices, such as alcohol, tobacco and gambling. ...
  6. Grandfathered Activities

    Nonbank activities, some of which would normally not be permissible for bank holding companies and foreign banks in the United ...
Trading Center
×

You are using adblocking software

Want access to all of Investopedia? Add us to your “whitelist”
so you'll never miss a feature!