Assessable Capital Stock

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Assessable Capital Stock'

The capital stock of any bank or financial institution that could be subject to assessment. Assessable capital stock makes shareholders liable for an amount greater than what they paid for their stock. However, the assessment of this stock only takes place in the event of bankruptcy or insolvency.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Assessable Capital Stock'

Any capital stock that can be called and is not fully paid for can technically be referred to as assessable capital stock. However, the term is generally reserved for stock of banks or other financial institutions. Obviously, assessment of this stock will usually lead to a loss for the shareholders.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Capital

    1) Financial assets or the financial value of assets, such as ...
  2. Assessment

    Occurs when an asset's value must be determined for the purpose ...
  3. Common Stock Equivalent

    Securities such as stock options, warrants, preferred bonds, ...
  4. Stock

    A type of security that signifies ownership in a corporation ...
  5. Capital Stock

    The common and preferred stock a company is authorized to issue, ...
  6. Common Stock

    A security that represents ownership in a corporation. Holders ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. No results found.
Related Articles
  1. Investing Basics

    Stock Basics Tutorial

    If you're new to the stock market and want the basics, this is the tutorial for you!
  2. Investing Basics

    Knowing Your Rights As A Shareholder

    We delve into common stock owners' privileges and how to be vigilant in monitoring a company.
  3. Stock Analysis

    What’s The Best Airline Stock In the Industry?

    With many airlines forced to seek bankruptcy protection, Southwest Airlines stands out as having consistently remained profitable throughout its history.
  4. Investing

    What's a Sunk Cost?

    A sunk cost was incurred in the past, is independent of future events and cannot be recouped. Economists teach that sunk costs should not be considered when making a financial decision. Rather, ...
  5. Investing

    What's a Divestiture?

    Divestiture is when a company, government or other organization sells, shuts down or otherwise eliminates a division or operating unit. Divestitures happen for many reasons. Management may decide ...
  6. Fundamental Analysis

    Capital Budgeting

    Capital budgeting is a planning process used by companies to evaluate which large projects to invest in, and how to finance them. It is sometimes called “investment appraisal.”
  7. Investing

    What are Operating Expenses?

    An operating expense is any expenditure made for the purpose of operating a business. These expenses are the day-to-day costs that help keep the business going. Operating expenses are reflected ...
  8. Investing

    What's Overhead?

    Overhead is an accounting term used for expenses that have to be paid even if the business doesn’t earn any revenue. The business would not be able to operate without paying its overhead expenses, ...
  9. Entrepreneurship

    Alternatives To Business Bankruptcy

    Bankruptcy isn't the only alternative for a struggling business. It can try negotiating with creditors or liquidating assets outside the U.S courts.
  10. Credit & Loans

    Bankruptcy Consequences

    You've done the deed and are out from under your debts – or embarked on a repayment plan. What consequences can you expect and how long will recovery take?

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Technical Skills

    1. The knowledge and abilities needed to accomplish mathematical, engineering, scientific or computer-related duties, as ...
  2. Prepaid Expense

    A type of asset that arises on a balance sheet as a result of business making payments for goods and services to be received ...
  3. Gordon Growth Model

    A model for determining the intrinsic value of a stock, based on a future series of dividends that grow at a constant rate. ...
  4. Cost Accounting

    A type of accounting process that aims to capture a company's costs of production by assessing the input costs of each step ...
  5. Law Of Supply

    A microeconomic law stating that, all other factors being equal, as the price of a good or service increases, the quantity ...
  6. Investment Grade

    A rating that indicates that a municipal or corporate bond has a relatively low risk of default. Bond rating firms, such ...
Trading Center