Assessable Profit

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DEFINITION of 'Assessable Profit'

Taxable income payable after accounting for allowable deductions. Assessable profit is a calculation used in tax law to determine an individual's taxable income based upon gains or losses on funds held in taxable investment accounts. It is taken net of items, such as expenses within an investment account, depreciation and charitable donations.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Assessable Profit'

Assessable profits are an important tax measure in constituencies where tax payers may see large portions of taxable income come from investments held in taxable investment accounts. In Hong Kong, for instance, assessable profits are used to determine an individual's HK profits taxes payable. Such tax income is important for jurisdictions that rely on taxation for a bulk of their budgetary capital.

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