Asset Deficiency

DEFINITION of 'Asset Deficiency'

A situation where a company's liabilities exceed its assets. Asset deficiency is a sign of financial distress and indicates that a company may default on its obligations to creditors and may be headed for bankruptcy. Asset deficiency can also cause a publicly traded company to be delisted from a stock exchange.

BREAKING DOWN 'Asset Deficiency'

A company that has a chance at recovering financially may file for chapter 11 bankruptcy, under which the company is restructured, continues to operate and attempts to regain profitability. In a worst-case scenario, asset deficiency may force a company to liquidate, in order to pay off creditors and bondholders. The company will file for chapter 7 bankruptcy and go completely out of business. In this situation, shareholders are the last to be repaid, and they may not receive any money at all.

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RELATED FAQS
  1. Does working capital include stock?

    A certain portion of a company’s working capital is generally composed of earnings; however, current short-term assets that ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What are some alternatives a company can attempt prior to resorting to liquidation?

    Some alternatives a company's owners can attempt prior to resorting to liquidation are selling the company, raising money ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. Under what circumstances might a company decide to liquidate?

    There are many reasons a company may decide to liquidate. A smaller company may decide to liquidate if one of the main owners ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What happens to the shares of a company that has been liquidated?

    The fate of a liquidating company’s shares depends on the type of liquidation the company is undergoing. The most common ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What is the difference between compulsory and voluntary liquidation?

    Liquidation is the process where a firm's assets and liabilities are terminated, realized and subsequently distributed. In ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What can cause a merger or acquisition deal to fail?

    When two large companies announce plans to merge, or when the larger of the two acquires the smaller entity, the surviving ... Read Full Answer >>
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