Asset/Liability Management

What is 'Asset/Liability Management'

Asset/liability management is a technique companies employ in coordinating the management of assets and liabilities so that an adequate return may be earned.

Also known as "surplus management."

BREAKING DOWN 'Asset/Liability Management'

By managing a company's assets and liabilities, executives are able to influence net earnings, which may translate into increased stock prices.

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