Asset Value Per Share

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DEFINITION of 'Asset Value Per Share'

The total value of a fund's investments divided by its number of shares outstanding. This type of asset value per share is more commonly referred to as "net asset value per share" or simply "net asset value" or "NAV." Asset value per share can also refer to a public company's total assets minus its total liabilities, divided by its number of shares outstanding. In this case, asset value per share may be referred to as "net current asset value per share."

BREAKING DOWN 'Asset Value Per Share'

For most funds, asset value per share is the price at which shares in that fund can be bought and sold. For publicly traded companies, investors can use asset value per share to compare the price of the company's stock to the underlying value of the company's stock. Significant differences between these two numbers can indicate a prudent time to buy or sell.

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