Asset-Based Finance

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Asset-Based Finance'

A specialized method of providing structured working capital and term loans that are secured by accounts receivable, inventory, machinery, equipment and/or real estate. This type of funding is great for startup companies, refinancing existing loans, financing growth, mergers and acquisitions, and management buy-outs (MBOs) and buy-ins (MBIs).

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Asset-Based Finance'

An example of asset-based finance would be purchase order financing; this may be attractive to a company that has stretched its credit limits with vendors and has reached its lending capacity at the bank. The inability to finance raw materials to fill all orders would leave a company operating under capacity. The asset-based lender finances the purchase of the raw material, and the purchase orders are then assigned to the lender. After the orders are filled, payment is made to the lender, and the lender then deducts its cost and fees and remits the balance to the company. The disadvantage of this type of financing, however, is the high interest typically charged - which can be as high as prime plus 10%.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Acquisition

    A corporate action in which a company buys most, if not all, ...
  2. Management Buyout - MBO

    A transaction where a company’s management team purchases the ...
  3. Asset Base

    The underlying assets giving value to a company, investment or ...
  4. Prime Rate

    The interest rate that commercial banks charge their most credit-worthy ...
  5. Asset-Based Lending

    A business loan secured by collateral (assets). The loan, or ...
  6. Collateral

    Property or other assets that a borrower offers a lender to secure ...
Related Articles
  1.  Here we take a look at how you can evaluate whether the debt will affect your investment.
    Investing Basics

    Will Corporate Debt Drag Your Stock Down?

    Borrowed funds can mean a leg up for companies or the boot for investors. Find out how to tell the difference.
  2. Bonds & Fixed Income

    What Are Corporate Actions?

    Be a savvy investor - learn how corporate actions affect you as a shareholder.
  3. Stock Analysis

    Breaking Down the Halliburton Baker Hughes Deal

    Halliburton is using a downturn to get bigger and stronger in the long term, and the company is getting Baker Hughes at a reasonable price as a result.
  4. Brokers

    Key Differences Between M&A Advisors And Business Brokers

    For a buy, sale or partnership for one's business, one needs brokers and advisors to proceed ahead. Here are the key differences between business brokers and M&A advisors.
  5. Trading Strategies

    Selecting Mergers & Acquisitions Advisories For Small Businesses

    Mergers and acquisitions advisories aren't just for big players. Many advisory firms cater to small and medium businesses.
  6. Investing

    M&A Advisory Business Boutiques: How The Small Shops Are Capturing Large M&A Deals

    M&A advisory boutiques are becoming a big business, giving large investment banks a run for their money.
  7. Investing

    The Top Reasons Why M&A Deals Fail

    A significant number of M&A transactions result in failure. Here are the top reasons, with examples, of why it happens.
  8. Investing Basics

    What Merger And Acquisition Firms Do

    The merger or acquisition process can be intimidating. This is why merger and acquisition firms step in to facilitate the process.
  9. Investing Basics

    Analysis of Companies with high goodwill

    High goodwill as a percentage of market cap can actually be a big red flag--it potentially means the company botched a major acquisition.
  10. Investing Basics

    How Mergers and Acquisitions Can Affect A Company

    M&A can have a profound effect on a company’s growth prospects and outlook, but with a significant degree of risk.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Christmas Island Dollar

    The former currency of Christmas Island, an Australian island in the Indian Ocean that was discovered on December 25, 1643. ...
  2. Santa Claus Rally

    A surge in the price of stocks that often occurs in the week between Christmas and New Year's Day. There are numerous explanations ...
  3. Commodity

    1. A basic good used in commerce that is interchangeable with other commodities of the same type. Commodities are most often ...
  4. Deferred Revenue

    Advance payments or unearned revenue, recorded on the recipient's balance sheet as a liability, until the services have been ...
  5. Multinational Corporation - MNC

    A corporation that has its facilities and other assets in at least one country other than its home country. Such companies ...
  6. SWOT Analysis

    A tool that identifies the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats of an organization. Specifically, SWOT is a basic, ...
Trading Center