Asset Financing

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DEFINITION of 'Asset Financing'

Using balance sheet assets (such as accounts receivable, short-term investments or inventory) to obtain a loan or borrow money - the borrower provides a security interest in the assets to the lender. This differs from traditional financing methods, such as issuing debt or equity securities, as the company simply pledges some of its assets in exchange for a quick cash loan.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Asset Financing'

This type of financing is typically used for short-term borrowing or working capital. Companies using asset financing commonly pledge their accounts receivable, but the use of inventory assets is becoming more frequent.

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RELATED FAQS
  1. What is the difference between asset-based lending and asset financing?

    In the most common usage, the terms "asset-based lending" and "asset financing" refer to the same thing. Asset-based lending ... Read Full Answer >>
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