Asset Quality Rating

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DEFINITION of 'Asset Quality Rating'

A review or evaluation assessing the credit risk associated with a particular asset. These assets usually require interest payments - such as a loans and investment portfolios. How effective management is in controlling and monitoring credit risk can also have an affect on the what kind of credit rating is given.

BREAKING DOWN 'Asset Quality Rating'

Many factors are considered when rating asset quality. For example, consideration must be put into whether or not a portfolio is appropriately diversified, what regulations or rules have been put in to place to limit credit risks and how efficiently operations are being utilized. Typically, a rating of one shows that asset quality is good and there is very little credit risk, while a rating of five can signify that there are major asset quality problems and issues that need to be managed.

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