Asset Quality Rating

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Asset Quality Rating'

A review or evaluation assessing the credit risk associated with a particular asset. These assets usually require interest payments - such as a loans and investment portfolios. How effective management is in controlling and monitoring credit risk can also have an affect on the what kind of credit rating is given.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Asset Quality Rating'

Many factors are considered when rating asset quality. For example, consideration must be put into whether or not a portfolio is appropriately diversified, what regulations or rules have been put in to place to limit credit risks and how efficiently operations are being utilized. Typically, a rating of one shows that asset quality is good and there is very little credit risk, while a rating of five can signify that there are major asset quality problems and issues that need to be managed.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Six Sigma

    A quality-control program developed in 1986 by Motorola. Initially, ...
  2. Bankruptcy Risk

    The possibility that a company will be unable to meet its debt ...
  3. Default

    1. The failure to promptly pay interest or principal when due. ...
  4. Credit Risk

    The risk of loss of principal or loss of a financial reward stemming ...
  5. CAMELS Rating System

    An international bank-rating system where bank supervisory authorities ...
  6. Market Risk

    The possibility for an investor to experience losses due to factors ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. I have discovered that a bond I am interested in has a sinking fund. What does this ...

    First, understand that a sinking fund provision is really just a pool of money set aside by a corporation to help repay a ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. How is my credit score calculated?

    The credit score, commonly referred to as a FICO score, is a proprietary tool created by the Fair Isaac Corporation. This ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Investing Basics

    What Is A Corporate Credit Rating?

    Is the bond you're buying investment grade, or just junk? Find out how to check the score.
  2. Bonds & Fixed Income

    Corporate Bonds: An Introduction To Credit Risk

    Corporate bonds offer higher yields, but it's important to evaluate the extra risk involved before you buy.
  3. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    Evaluating Bond Funds: Keeping It Simple

    Discover some of the key factors for determining a fund's risk-return profile.
  4. Options & Futures

    Introduction To Inflation-Protected Securities

    Inflation is an enemy to investors - except to those who invest in IPS, which guarantee a real rate of return with no credit risk.
  5. Economics

    The Fed's Impact On Emerging Markets

    Higher US interest rates could make it more expensive for emerging market borrowers to service their debt commitments.
  6. Credit & Loans

    Understanding Credit Risk

    Credit risk arises whenever a borrower is expecting to use future cash flows to pay a current debt.
  7. Economics

    What is Value Added?

    Value added is used to describe instances where a firm takes a product and adds a feature that gives customers a greater sense of value.
  8. Economics

    What is a Wholly Owned Subsidiary?

    A company whose common stock is 100% owned by another company, called the parent company.
  9. Economics

    What is the Breakeven Point?

    In general, when gains or revenue earned equals the money spent to earn the gains or revenue, you’ve hit the breakeven point.
  10. Credit & Loans

    What are the Five C's of Credit?

    The five C’s of credit are what banks and other lenders evaluate about a potential borrower when making a lending decision. The five C’s are Character, Capacity, Capital, Collateral and Conditions. ...

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. DuPont Analysis

    A method of performance measurement that was started by the DuPont Corporation in the 1920s. With this method, assets are ...
  2. Asset Class

    A group of securities that exhibit similar characteristics, behave similarly in the marketplace, and are subject to the same ...
  3. Fiat Money

    Currency that a government has declared to be legal tender, but is not backed by a physical commodity. The value of fiat ...
  4. Interest Rate Risk

    The risk that an investment's value will change due to a change in the absolute level of interest rates, in the spread between ...
  5. Income Effect

    In the context of economic theory, the income effect is the change in an individual's or economy's income and how that change ...
  6. Price-To-Sales Ratio - PSR

    A valuation ratio that compares a company’s stock price to its revenues. The price-to-sales ratio is an indicator of the ...
Trading Center