Asset Stripping

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DEFINITION of 'Asset Stripping'

The process of buying an undervalued company with the intent to sell off its assets for a profit. The individual assets of the company, such as its equipment and property, may be more valuable than the company as a whole due to such factors as poor management or poor economic conditions.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Asset Stripping'

For example, imagine that a company has three distinct businesses: trucking, golf clubs and clothing. If the value of the company is currently $100 million but another company believes that it can sell each of its three businesses to other companies for $50 million each, an asset stripping opportunity exists. The purchasing company will then purchase the three-business company for $100 million and sell each company off, potentially making $50 million.

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