Assignment Method

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DEFINITION of 'Assignment Method'

A method of allocating organizational resources. The assignment method is used to determine what resources are assigned to which department, machine or center of operation in the production process. This method is used to allocate the proper number of employees to a machine or task, and the number of jobs that a given machine or factory can produce.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Assignment Method'

The assignment method is actually used for other purposes besides production allocations. It can be employed to assign the number of salespersons to a given territory or territories. It can also be used to match bidders to contracts and assign other relevant components of business to each other.

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