Assignment Of Accounts Receivable

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Assignment Of Accounts Receivable'

A lending agreement, often long term, between a borrowing company and a lending institution whereby the borrower assigns specific customer accounts that owe money (accounts receivable) to the lending institution. In exchange for assignment of accounts receivable, the borrower receives a cash advance for a percentage of the accounts receivable. The borrower pays interest and a service charge on the advance.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Assignment Of Accounts Receivable'

If the borrower retains ownership of the accounts, then the borrower continues to collect the accounts receivable and passes the payments on to the lender. Since the borrower retains ownership, he also retains the risk that some accounts receivable will not be repaid. In this case, the lending institution may demand payment directly from the borrower. This arrangement is called assignment of accounts receivable with recourse. Assignment of accounts receivable should not be confused with pledging or factoring of accounts receivable.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Full Recourse Debt

    A guarantee that no matter what happens, the borrower will repay ...
  2. Assignment

    1. The transfer of an individual's rights or property to another ...
  3. Accounts Receivable - AR

    Money owed by customers (individuals or corporations) to another ...
  4. Non-Recourse Finance

    A loan where the lending bank is only entitled to repayment from ...
  5. Finance

    The science that describes the management, creation and study ...
  6. General Ledger

    A company's main accounting records. A general ledger is a complete ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. What is the difference between a non-recourse loan and a recourse loan?

    The essential difference between a recourse and non-recourse loan has to do with which assets a lender can go after if a ...
Related Articles
  1. Entrepreneurship

    Small Business: Speed Up Receivables To Avoid A Cash Crunch

    Waiting for customers to pay can be a losing game. Look to factoring for quicker cash.
  2. Personal Finance

    A Look At Accounting Careers

    More than just crunching numbers, this career blends detective work with trouble shooting.
  3. Markets

    Intangible Assets Provide Real Value To Stocks

    Intangible assets don't appear on balance sheets, but they're crucial to judging a company's value.
  4. Investing

    What's a Debit Note?

    A debit note is a document used by a seller to inform a purchaser of a dollar amount owed. As the name indicates, it is a note from the seller that a debit has been made to the purchaser’s account. ...
  5. Investing

    What's Capitalization?

    Capitalization has different meanings depending on the context.
  6. Fundamental Analysis

    The Best 5 Online Accounting Systems For Small Business

    Running a small business can be difficult, but thanks to these online accounting services, taking care of payroll doesn't have to be.
  7. Investing

    Understanding Cost Accounting

    Cost accounting is the method of financially allocating expenses to goods that are manufactured for resale. Cost accounting is also referred to as managerial accounting, because managers use ...
  8. Investing

    What are Prepaid Expenses?

    A prepaid expense is an asset on the balance sheet. Due to accounting principles, expenses are often accrued on the balance sheet and expensed in a later period.
  9. Investing

    What's a Sunk Cost?

    A sunk cost was incurred in the past, is independent of future events and cannot be recouped. Economists teach that sunk costs should not be considered when making a financial decision. Rather, ...
  10. Investing

    What are Fixed Costs?

    Fixed costs are business expenses that do not change as the level of production goes up or down. They are one of two types of business expense, the other being variable costs. Variable costs ...

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Sunk Cost

    A cost that has already been incurred and thus cannot be recovered. A sunk cost differs from other, future costs that a business ...
  2. Technical Skills

    1. The knowledge and abilities needed to accomplish mathematical, engineering, scientific or computer-related duties, as ...
  3. Prepaid Expense

    A type of asset that arises on a balance sheet as a result of business making payments for goods and services to be received ...
  4. Gordon Growth Model

    A model for determining the intrinsic value of a stock, based on a future series of dividends that grow at a constant rate. ...
  5. Cost Accounting

    A type of accounting process that aims to capture a company's costs of production by assessing the input costs of each step ...
  6. Law Of Supply

    A microeconomic law stating that, all other factors being equal, as the price of a good or service increases, the quantity ...
Trading Center