Assignment Of Accounts Receivable

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Assignment Of Accounts Receivable'

A lending agreement, often long term, between a borrowing company and a lending institution whereby the borrower assigns specific customer accounts that owe money (accounts receivable) to the lending institution. In exchange for assignment of accounts receivable, the borrower receives a cash advance for a percentage of the accounts receivable. The borrower pays interest and a service charge on the advance.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Assignment Of Accounts Receivable'

If the borrower retains ownership of the accounts, then the borrower continues to collect the accounts receivable and passes the payments on to the lender. Since the borrower retains ownership, he also retains the risk that some accounts receivable will not be repaid. In this case, the lending institution may demand payment directly from the borrower. This arrangement is called assignment of accounts receivable with recourse. Assignment of accounts receivable should not be confused with pledging or factoring of accounts receivable.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Full Recourse Debt

    A guarantee that no matter what happens, the borrower will repay ...
  2. Assignment

    1. The transfer of an individual's rights or property to another ...
  3. Accounts Receivable - AR

    Money owed by customers (individuals or corporations) to another ...
  4. Non-Recourse Finance

    A loan where the lending bank is only entitled to repayment from ...
  5. Finance

    The science that describes the management, creation and study ...
  6. General Ledger

    A company's main accounting records. A general ledger is a complete ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. What is the difference between a non-recourse loan and a recourse loan?

    The essential difference between a recourse and non-recourse loan has to do with which assets a lender can go after if a ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. Why is the use of contra accounts so important for maintaining ledgers?

    Contra accounts have been used in financial accounting to verify the balance of another corresponding account since Renaissance ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. What impact did the Sarbanes-Oxley Act have on corporate governance in the United ...

    After a prolonged period of corporate scandals involving large public companies from 2000 to 2002, the Sarbanes-Oxley Act ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. How is deferred revenue treated under accrual accounting?

    In accrual accounting, deferred revenue, or unearned revenue, represents a liability on the balance sheet recorded on funds ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What are some of the advantages and disadvantages of absorption costing?

    Companies must choose between using absorption costing or variable costing in their accounting systems. There are advantages ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What is the difference between the cost of capital and the discount rate?

    The cost of capital refers to the actual cost of financing business activity through either debt or equity capital. The discount ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Entrepreneurship

    Small Business: Speed Up Receivables To Avoid A Cash Crunch

    Waiting for customers to pay can be a losing game. Look to factoring for quicker cash.
  2. Personal Finance

    A Look At Accounting Careers

    More than just crunching numbers, this career blends detective work with trouble shooting.
  3. Markets

    Intangible Assets Provide Real Value To Stocks

    Intangible assets don't appear on balance sheets, but they're crucial to judging a company's value.
  4. Economics

    What are Accounting Principles?

    The term accounting principles refers to rules and guidelines companies use to help them record their business and financial transactions.
  5. Economics

    Understanding the Accounting Cycle

    An accounting cycle consists of the traditional procedures performed to record business events and transactions in a company’s accounting records.
  6. Fundamental Analysis

    When & Why Should a Company Use LIFO

    By using LIFO (last in, first out) when prices are rising, companies reduce their taxes and also better match revenues to their latest costs.
  7. Fundamental Analysis

    The Importance Of Analyzing Accounts Receivable

    While investors often focus on revenues, net income, and earnings per share, they should not overlook the importance of analyzing accounts receivable.
  8. Investing Basics

    Explaining Write-Downs

    A write-down is a reduction in the book value of an asset because it is overvalued compared to the market value.
  9. Economics

    What are Noncurrent Assets?

    Noncurrent assets are property that a company owns that will last for more than one year.
  10. Investing Basics

    How Much Do CPAs Make?

    If you're considering becoming a CPA, here's what you might expect to earn.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Net Worth

    The amount by which assets exceed liabilities. Net worth is a concept applicable to individuals and businesses as a key measure ...
  2. Stop-Loss Order

    An order placed with a broker to sell a security when it reaches a certain price. A stop-loss order is designed to limit ...
  3. Covered Call

    An options strategy whereby an investor holds a long position in an asset and writes (sells) call options on that same asset ...
  4. Butterfly Spread

    A neutral option strategy combining bull and bear spreads. Butterfly spreads use four option contracts with the same expiration ...
  5. Unlevered Beta

    A type of metric that compares the risk of an unlevered company to the risk of the market. The unlevered beta is the beta ...
  6. Moving Average - MA

    A widely used indicator in technical analysis that helps smooth out price action by filtering out the “noise” from random ...
Trading Center