Assignor

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DEFINITION of 'Assignor'

A person, company or entity who transfers rights they hold to another entity. The assignor transfers to the assignee. For example, a party (the assignor) that enters into a contract to sell a piece of property can assign the proceeds, or benefits of the contract, to a third party (the assignee).

BREAKING DOWN 'Assignor'

Each different type of assignment can carry a different set of regulations, with some assignments, such as intellectual property rights, having special conditions that must be met. The assignee should pay close attention to any agreement, since unscrupulous assignors might give the same rights to mulitple parties.

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