At Limit

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DEFINITION of 'At Limit'

An order that sets a maximum limit on the buy price and/or a minimum limit on the sell price. An at limit order, rather than triggering a transaction at a specified price, like a standard limit order, stops triggering once the limit is reached.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'At Limit'

At limit orders can be especially useful when one is placing bulk orders or if the market is moving very rapidly in one direction or the other. It's also helpful when one is seeking to accumulate or dissipate a position over time.

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