At-The-Opening-Order

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DEFINITION of 'At-The-Opening-Order'

An investor's directive to her broker or brokerage firm to buy or sell specified securities in her account at the very beginning of the trading day. If the order cannot be executed at the opening of the market, it will be canceled.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'At-The-Opening-Order'

An investor might place an at-the-opening order based on something that happened after the market closed on the previous trading day that is expected to affect the stock's opening price on the following trading day. An at-the-opening order may not be executed at the security's exact opening price, but it should be within the opening range.

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