ATA Carnet

AAA

DEFINITION of 'ATA Carnet'

An international customs document that allows its users to eliminate import duties and taxes and clear customs quickly on temporary imports into participating carnet countries and territories. For example, the carnet is helpful to music tour managers who need to bring equipment and merchandise related to a show into a country for a few days or a few weeks. Almost all types of goods can be imported with an ATA carnet except for consumable goods, disposable goods and mail.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'ATA Carnet'

The ATA carnet is also called the Merchandise Passport for Boomerang Freight because it is valid only for merchandise and equipment that will be exported back out of the country within 12 months. The carnet is meant to apply to three major categories of items: professional equipment, items for sale at exhibitions or trade shows, and commercial samples.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Free Trade Area

    A group of countries that invoke little or no price control in ...
  2. Tariff

    A tax imposed on imported goods and services. Tariffs are used ...
  3. Import Duty

    A tax collected on imports and some exports by the customs authorities ...
  4. Trade War

    A negative side effect of protectionism that occurs when Country ...
  5. Quota

    A government-imposed trade restriction that limits the number, ...
  6. Special Economic Zone - SEZ

    Designated areas in countries that possess special economic regulations ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. What is the difference between consumer surplus and economic surplus?

    The consumer surplus is the difference between the highest price a consumer is willing to pay and the actual market price ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What does it signify about a given product if the consumer surplus figure for that ...

    High consumer surplus for a particular product signifies a high level of utility for consumers and may carry some implications ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. What are common reasons for governments to implement tariffs?

    A tariff is a tax imposed by a governing authority on goods or services entering or leaving the country and is typically ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. How does mercantilism impede global economic growth?

    Mercantilism impedes global economic growth by leading producers to specialize in goods and services that do not take account ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. How do "factor endowments" impact a country's comparative advantage?

    Factor endowments impact a country's comparative advantage by affecting the opportunity cost of specializing in producing ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What does 'Incoterms' mean in relation to Ex Works (EXW) trades?

    Ex works is part of the published Incoterms and outlines the obligations of transportation to buyers and sellers. The International ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Personal Finance

    What Is International Trade?

    Everyone's talking about globalization, so we explain what is it and why some oppose it.
  2. Economics

    Globalization: Progress Or Profiteering?

    Proponents of globalization argue that it helps the economies of developing nations and makes goods cheaper, while critics say that globalization reduces domestic jobs and exploits foreign workers. ...
  3. Economics

    What Is The World Trade Organization?

    The WTO sets the global rules of trade. But what exactly does it do and why do so many oppose it?
  4. Economics

    NAFTA's Winners And Losers

    Read on to find out who this free-trade agreement helped, and who it hurt.
  5. Economics

    What is a Capital Account?

    Capital account is an economic term that refers to the net change in investment and asset ownership for a nation.
  6. Economics

    Understanding the Fisher Effect

    The Fisher effect states that the real interest rate equals the nominal interest rate minus the expected inflation rate.
  7. Investing

    The Labor Market Recovery’s Missing Ingredient

    Job creation is running at the fastest pace since the 90s, and there is some evidence that wage growth is finally starting to accelerate, albeit modestly.
  8. Economics

    Gambling on Macau: Too Risky?

    Macau was once heralded as the new Las Vegas for casino investors. Is it too late?
  9. Economics

    When To Expect Fed Liftoff Now

    “When will the Fed raise interest rates?” That has been the question of many investors since the Fed indicated it was prepared to end its zero rate policy.
  10. Investing News

    A New Corporate Governance Initiative In Japan

    Expectations are low that Japan can create a corporate governance climate that meets global standards, but a new initiative is aimed at doing just that.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Venture-Capital-Backed IPO

    The selling to the public of shares in a company that has previously been funded primarily by private investors. The alternative ...
  2. Merger Arbitrage

    A hedge fund strategy in which the stocks of two merging companies are simultaneously bought and sold to create a riskless ...
  3. Market Failure

    An economic term that encompasses a situation where, in any given market, the quantity of a product demanded by consumers ...
  4. Unsystematic Risk

    Company or industry specific risk that is inherent in each investment. The amount of unsystematic risk can be reduced through ...
  5. Security Market Line - SML

    A line that graphs the systematic, or market, risk versus return of the whole market at a certain time and shows all risky ...
  6. Tangible Net Worth

    A measure of the physical worth of a company, which does not include any value derived from intangible assets such as copyrights, ...
Trading Center