Atlanta Fed Index

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DEFINITION of 'Atlanta Fed Index'

A monthly survey of manufacturing firms located in the southeastern United States conducted by the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta. The index is also known as the Southeaster Manufacturing Survey. The Atlanta Fed Index tracks both current and expected indexes for production, shipments, new orders, backlog orders, finish good inventories, employees, average workweek length and new orders.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Atlanta Fed Index'

Although several Federal Reserve banks publish manufacturing indices for their regions, the Atlanta Fed Index is one of the most closely watched. The index is seen as an important manufacturing indicator because the states covered are among the most manufacturing-heavy states in the U.S. The survey is conducted monthly.

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