Automated Teller Machine - ATM

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DEFINITION of 'Automated Teller Machine - ATM'

An electronic banking outlet, which allows customers to complete basic transactions without the aid of a branch representative or teller.

There are two primary types of automated teller machines, or ATMs. The basic units allow the customer to only withdraw cash and receive a report of the account's balance. The more complex machines will accept deposits, facilitate credit card payments and report account information. To access the advanced features of the complex units, you will usually need to be a member of the bank that operates the machine.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Automated Teller Machine - ATM'

ATMs are scattered throughout cities, allowing customers easier access to their accounts. Anyone with a debit or credit card will be able to access most ATMs. Using a machine operated by your bank is usually free, but accessing funds through a unit owned by a competing bank will usually incur a small fee.

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