After Tax Operating Income - ATOI

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DEFINITION of 'After Tax Operating Income - ATOI'

A company's total operating income after taxes. This non-GAAP measure excludes any after-tax benefits or charges such as effects from accounting changes.

After Tax Operating Income (ATOI)


INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'After Tax Operating Income - ATOI'

Due to its non-GAAP nature, what is included and excluded in the measure differs, therefore, it is important to understand how the company arrived at the value.

ATOI is similar to net operating profit after tax (NOPAT).

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