Attribute Sampling

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DEFINITION of 'Attribute Sampling'

A mathematical process used to analyze the characteristics of a given population of subjects. For example, a sampling of returns on an index or security can provide insight into how the subject performs under various market conditions.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Attribute Sampling'

An attribute is defined as a specific characteristic or feature of a given subject. In the world of finance, attribute sampling could reveal how many mortgages are past due and how many are current. The attribute in this case would obviously be status of the mortgage payments. However, attribute samplings may be more complex in nature, examining several different variables.

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