Audit Committee

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Audit Committee'

An operating committee of a company's board of directors that is in charge of overseeing financial reporting and disclosure. All U.S. publicly-traded companies must maintain a qualified audit committee in order to be listed on a stock exchange. Committee members must be made up of independent outside directors, including a minimum of one person who qualifies as a financial expert.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Audit Committee'

Audit committees maintain communication with the company's chief financial officer (CFO) and controller. Audit committees typically have the authority to initiate special investigations in cases where they determine accounting practices are problematic or suspect, or where problems exist with personnel. The audit committee's role includes the oversight of financial reporting, the monitoring of accounting policies, the oversight of any external auditors, regulatory compliance, and the discussion of risk management policies with management.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Horizontal Audit

    An evaluation of one process or activity across several groups ...
  2. Financial Statements

    Records that outline the financial activities of a business, ...
  3. Balance Sheet

    A financial statement that summarizes a company's assets, liabilities ...
  4. Accounting

    The systematic and comprehensive recording of financial transactions ...
  5. Generally Accepted Accounting Principles ...

    The common set of accounting principles, standards and procedures ...
  6. Certified Public Accountant - CPA

    A designation given by the American Institute of Certified Public ...
Related Articles
  1. Insurance

    Evaluating The Board Of Directors

    Corporate structure can tell you a lot about a company's potential. Learn more here.
  2. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    How do hedge funds use short selling?

    Learn how hedge funds use short selling to profit from stocks that are falling in price. Explore different analytical techniques hedge funds employ to find investments.
  3. Fundamental Analysis

    What is the difference between operating cash flow and net income?

    Learn how net income is an income statement for a certain period of time, while cash flow shows inflows and outflows based on conversion of sales into cash.
  4. Fundamental Analysis

    How do I calculate dividend payout ratio from a balance sheet?

    Understand what the dividend payout ratio indicates and learn how it can be calculated using the figures from a company's balance sheet statement.
  5. Credit & Loans

    When is it necessary to get a letter of credit?

    Capitalize on assets and negate risks by using a letter of credit. Letters of credit are often requested for buying, selling or trading.
  6. Fundamental Analysis

    Can entities other than banks issue letters of credit?

    Obtaining a letter of credit from a non-bank is legally acceptable according to the ICC, but companies tend to prefer to receive them from banks.
  7. Investing Basics

    What is common stock and preferred stock?

    Learn about the differences between common and preferred shares. Explore situations where preferred shares have more favorable rights of ownership.
  8. Fundamental Analysis

    Why should fundamental investors pay attention to Cash Value Added (CVA)?

    Take a deeper look at cash value added, a metric used by fundamental investors to assess the ability of a company to meet cash flow obligations.
  9. Investing Basics

    What is the difference between tangible and intangible assets?

    Discover the difference between tangible assets and intangible assets and the types of assets that are in each. Additionally, learn where these are recorded.
  10. Fundamental Analysis

    What is considered a good PEG (price to earnings growth) ratio?

    Learn about the price/earnings to growth (PEG) ratio and understand what investors and market analysts consider a good ratio for this valuation measure.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Treasury Bond - T-Bond

    A marketable, fixed-interest U.S. government debt security with a maturity of more than 10 years. Treasury bonds make interest ...
  2. Weight Of Ice, Snow Or Sleet Insurance

    Financial protection against damage caused to property by winter weather specifically, damage caused if a roof caves in because ...
  3. Weather Insurance

    A type of protection against a financial loss that may be incurred because of rain, snow, storms, wind, fog, undesirable ...
  4. Portfolio Turnover

    A measure of how frequently assets within a fund are bought and sold by the managers. Portfolio turnover is calculated by ...
  5. Commercial Paper

    An unsecured, short-term debt instrument issued by a corporation, typically for the financing of accounts receivable, inventories ...
  6. Federal Funds Rate

    The interest rate at which a depository institution lends funds maintained at the Federal Reserve to another depository institution ...
Trading Center