Auditor

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DEFINITION of 'Auditor'

An official whose job it is to carefully check the accuracy of business records. An auditor can be either an independent auditor unaffiliated with the company being audited or a captive auditor, and some are elected public officials. The term is sometimes synonymous with "comptroller." Auditors are used to ensure that organizations are maintaining accurate and honest financial records and statements.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Auditor'

Auditors can work for many different entities, such as the IRS or a state government. Auditors are also found in the private sector at accounting firms. There are both internal and external auditors; internal auditors are usually employees or contractors with the company they are auditing, while external auditors generally work either directly for or in conjunction with governmental agencies.

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