Auditor's Opinion

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DEFINITION of 'Auditor's Opinion'

A certification that accompanies financial statements and is provided by the independent accountants who audit a company's books and records and help produce the financial statements. The auditor's opinion will set out the scope of the audit, the accountant's opinion of the procedures and records used to produce the statements, and the accountant's opinion of whether or not the financial statements present an accurate picture of the company's financial condition.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Auditor's Opinion'

There are generally three types of auditor's opinions. A "clean" or unqualified opinion states that the financial statements present a fair and accurate picture of the company and comply with generally accepted accounting principles. A qualified opinion contains exceptions, which may include the scope of the audit.

An adverse opinion contains a major exception or warning. The most well-known adverse opinion is the "going-concern" exception, in which the accountant expresses doubts about the company's ability to remain in business.

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