Authorized Forex Dealer

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DEFINITION of 'Authorized Forex Dealer'

Any type of financial institution that has received authorization from a relevant regulatory body to act as a dealer involved with the trading of foreign currencies. Dealing with authorized forex dealers ensure that your transactions are being executed in a legal and just way.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Authorized Forex Dealer'

In the United States, one regulatory body responsible for authorizing forex dealers is the National Futures Association (NFA). The NFA ensures that authorized forex dealers are subject to stringent screening upon registration and strong enforcement of regulations upon approval.

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