Automatic Investment Plan - AIP

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DEFINITION of 'Automatic Investment Plan - AIP'

An investment program that allows investors to contribute small amounts of money, such as $20 a month in regular intervals. Funds are automatically deducted from the investor's checking/savings account or paycheck and invested in a retirement account or mutual fund.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Automatic Investment Plan - AIP'

This is one of the best ways to save money. By "paying themselves first" many people find they invest more in the long run. Their investments are treated as another part of their regular budget. It also forces a person to pay for investments automatically, which prevents them from being able to spend all of their disposable income.

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