Availability Schedule

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DEFINITION of 'Availability Schedule'

The number of days it takes for a third-party check deposited into a customer's checking account to become available to the customer. While the funds are unavailable until cleared, they are referred to as "checks held".

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Availability Schedule'

The maximum number of days that funds can be held by banks is dictated by the Expedited Funds Availability Act, which was enacted by Congress in 1987 and subsequently became a Federal Reserve regulation. Many banks will make checks available before the maximum number of days is up.

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