Availability

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DEFINITION of 'Availability'

Funds that have been deposited by third-party check into a customer's bank account. These funds are typically not usable by the customer until the check clears, or they become "good funds."

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Availability'

Third-party checks are available according to a schedule that relies on the location of the bank on which the check is drawn. The maximum number of days that a check can be held is set by the Expedited Funds Availability Act, assuming the check is good.

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