Available Credit

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DEFINITION of 'Available Credit'

The unused portion of an open line of credit, such as a credit card or a revolving loan (such as a home-equity line of credit). Available credit is the difference between the amount of the credit line or limit, and the amount that has already been borrowed.

Available credit is considered readily available for withdrawal or for direct purchases.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Available Credit'

Available credit can be a key factor in a credit score, along with amounts outstanding from various lenders. A reasonable amount of available credit proves that the customer has successfully obtained credit lines in the past, and has the discipline not to use all credit available to him or her.

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