Average Inventory

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Average Inventory'

A calculation comparing the value or number of a particular good or set of goods during two or more specified time periods. Average inventory is the median value of an inventory throughout a certain time period. A basic calculation for average inventory would be:

(Current Inventory + Previous Inventory) / 2

In this example, the current inventory, $10,000, is added to a previous inventory - for example, the inventory on the same day of the previous year, such as $8,000 - and divided by the two balance points, for an average of $9,000 (($10,000 + $8,000) / 2 = $9,000).

 

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Average Inventory'

Because two points do not always accurately represent changes in inventory, average inventory is frequently calculated by using 13 points. For instance, you could use the end of each month over the course of one fiscal year, including the base month. These points are then added together and divided by 13 (the number of points) to determine the average inventory. Another method is to calculate each month's average inventory, adding these figures and dividing by the number of points.

To learn more about average inventory, read Why is it sometimes better to use an average inventory figure when calculating the inventory turnover ratio?

RELATED TERMS
  1. Average Age Of Inventory

    The average number of days it takes for a firm to sell to consumers ...
  2. Inventory

    The raw materials, work-in-process goods and completely finished ...
  3. Beginning Inventory - BI

    The book value of goods, inputs or materials available for use ...
  4. Ending Inventory

    The value of goods available for sale at the end of the accounting ...
  5. Carrying Cost Of Inventory

    This is the cost a business incurs over a certain period of time, ...
  6. Nonadmitted Balance

    An item on an insurer’s balance sheet that represents reinsured ...
Related Articles
  1. Fundamental Analysis

    Measuring Company Efficiency

    Three useful indicators for measuring a retail company's efficiency are its inventory turnaround times, its receivables and its collection period.
  2. Fundamental Analysis

    Inventory Valuation For Investors: FIFO And LIFO

    We go over these methods of calculating this component of the balance sheet, and how the choice affects the bottom line.
  3. Markets

    What Is A Cash Flow Statement?

    Learn how the CFS relates to the balance sheet and income statement as a part of a company's financial reports.
  4. Investing

    What's a Debit Note?

    A debit note is a document used by a seller to inform a purchaser of a dollar amount owed. As the name indicates, it is a note from the seller that a debit has been made to the purchaser’s account. ...
  5. Investing

    What's Capitalization?

    Capitalization has different meanings depending on the context.
  6. Investing

    Deferred Tax Liability

    Deferred tax liability is a tax that has been assessed or is due for the current period, but has not yet been paid. The deferral arises because of timing differences between the accrual of the ...
  7. Fundamental Analysis

    The Best 5 Online Accounting Systems For Small Business

    Running a small business can be difficult, but thanks to these online accounting services, taking care of payroll doesn't have to be.
  8. Investing

    Understanding Cost Accounting

    Cost accounting is the method of financially allocating expenses to goods that are manufactured for resale. Cost accounting is also referred to as managerial accounting, because managers use ...
  9. Investing

    What are Prepaid Expenses?

    A prepaid expense is an asset on the balance sheet. Due to accounting principles, expenses are often accrued on the balance sheet and expensed in a later period.
  10. Investing

    What's a Sunk Cost?

    A sunk cost was incurred in the past, is independent of future events and cannot be recouped. Economists teach that sunk costs should not be considered when making a financial decision. Rather, ...

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Fixed Cost

    A cost that does not change with an increase or decrease in the amount of goods or services produced. Fixed costs are expenses ...
  2. Subsidy

    A benefit given by the government to groups or individuals usually in the form of a cash payment or tax reduction. The subsidy ...
  3. Sunk Cost

    A cost that has already been incurred and thus cannot be recovered. A sunk cost differs from other, future costs that a business ...
  4. Technical Skills

    1. The knowledge and abilities needed to accomplish mathematical, engineering, scientific or computer-related duties, as ...
  5. Prepaid Expense

    A type of asset that arises on a balance sheet as a result of business making payments for goods and services to be received ...
  6. Gordon Growth Model

    A model for determining the intrinsic value of a stock, based on a future series of dividends that grow at a constant rate. ...
Trading Center