Average Propensity To Consume

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Average Propensity To Consume'

The average propensity to consume (APC) refers to the percentage of income that is spent on goods and services rather than on savings. One can determine the percentage of income spent by dividing the average household consumption (what is spent) by the average household income (what is earned). The inverse of the average propensity to consume is the average propensity to save (APS).

BREAKING DOWN 'Average Propensity To Consume'

Economic periods where consumers are spending can boost the economy: more goods are purchased (high demand for goods and services); keeping more people employed and more businesses open. Periods where the tendency to save is increased can have a negative effect on the economy as people purchase fewer goods and services (low demand for goods and services), resulting in fewer jobs and increased business closures.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Consumer Spending

    The amount of money spent by households in an economy. The spending ...
  2. Disposable Income

    The amount of money that households have available for spending ...
  3. Discretionary Income

    The amount of an individual's income that is left for spending, ...
  4. Personal Income

    Total compensation received by an individual. Personal income ...
  5. Economy

    The large set of inter-related economic production and consumption ...
  6. Principal-Agent Problem

    The principal-agent problem develops when a principal creates ...
Related Articles
  1. Retirement

    Consumer Confidence: A Killer Statistic

    The consumer confidence is key to any market economy, so investors need to learn the measures and how to analyze them.
  2. Markets

    Consumer Spending As A Market Indicator

    What people buy and where they shop can provide valuable information about the economy.
  3. Retirement

    Are You Saving Too Much?

    "Spend now! Don't worry about retirement," say some experts. Could they possibly be right?
  4. Economics

    Understanding Switching Costs

    Consumers incur switching costs when they receive a monetary or other type of penalty for changing a supplier, brand or product.
  5. Investing

    What’s Holding Back the U.S. Consumer

    Even as job growth has surged and gasoline prices have plunged, U.S. consumers are proving slow to respond and repair their overextended balance sheets.
  6. Economics

    Understanding Organic Growth

    Organic growth is the increase in a company’s revenue and value due to internal operations.
  7. Economics

    Explaining Market Penetration

    Market penetration is the measure of how much a good or service is being used within a total potential market.
  8. Economics

    Calculating the Marginal Rate of Substitution

    The marginal rate of substitution determines how much of one good a consumer will give up to obtain extra units of another good.
  9. Economics

    Understanding Cost of Revenue

    The cost of revenue is the total costs a business incurs to manufacture and deliver a product or service.
  10. Fundamental Analysis

    Is India the Next Emerging Markets Superstar?

    With a shift towards manufacturing and services, India could be the next emerging market superstar. Here, we provide a detailed breakdown of its GDP.
RELATED FAQS
  1. Are Social Security payments included in the US GDP calculation?

    Social Security payments are not included in the U.S. definition of the gross domestic product (GDP). Transfer Payments For ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What is the utility function and how is it calculated?

    In economics, utility function is an important concept that measures preferences over a set of goods and services. Utility ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. What does marginal utility tell us about consumer choice?

    In microeconomics, utility represents a way to relate the amount of goods consumed to the amount of happiness or satisfaction ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What is the difference between JIT (just in time) and CMI (customer managed inventory)?

    Just-in-time (JIT) inventory management focuses solely on the need to replenish inventory only when it is required, reducing ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What are some examples of Apple and Google's best-selling product lines?

    There are many good examples of product lines in the technology sector from some of the largest companies in the world, such ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What is a negative write-off?

    A negative write-off is a write-off conducted by a company or accountant after deciding not to pay back an individual or ... Read Full Answer >>

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Dead Cat Bounce

    A temporary recovery from a prolonged decline or bear market, followed by the continuation of the downtrend. A dead cat bounce ...
  2. Bear Market

    A market condition in which the prices of securities are falling, and widespread pessimism causes the negative sentiment ...
  3. Alligator Spread

    An unprofitable spread that occurs as a result of large commissions charged on the transaction, regardless of favorable market ...
  4. Tiger Cub Economies

    The four Southeast Asian economies of Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines and Thailand. Tiger cub economy indicates that ...
  5. Gorilla

    A company that dominates an industry without having a complete monopoly. A gorilla firm has large control of the pricing ...
  6. Elephants

    Slang for large institutions that have the funds to make high volumes trades. Due to the large volumes of stock that elephants ...
Trading Center
×

You are using adblocking software

Want access to all of Investopedia? Add us to your “whitelist”
so you'll never miss a feature!