Average Propensity To Consume

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Average Propensity To Consume'

The average propensity to consume (APC) refers to the percentage of income that is spent on goods and services rather than on savings. One can determine the percentage of income spent by dividing the average household consumption (what is spent) by the average household income (what is earned). The inverse of the average propensity to consume is the average propensity to save (APS).

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Average Propensity To Consume'

Economic periods where consumers are spending can boost the economy: more goods are purchased (high demand for goods and services); keeping more people employed and more businesses open. Periods where the tendency to save is increased can have a negative effect on the economy as people purchase fewer goods and services (low demand for goods and services), resulting in fewer jobs and increased business closures.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Consumer Spending

    The amount of money spent by households in an economy. The spending ...
  2. Disposable Income

    The amount of money that households have available for spending ...
  3. Economy

    The large set of inter-related economic production and consumption ...
  4. Personal Income

    Total compensation received by an individual. Personal income ...
  5. Discretionary Income

    The amount of an individual's income that is left for spending, ...
  6. Cape Cod Method

    A method used to calculate loss reserves that uses weights proportional ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. Are there significant seasonal patterns in the electronics sector?

    There is strong seasonality in the electronics sector, with sales of nearly all kinds of electronics – computers, digital ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What makes the chemicals sector attractive to value investors?

    The chemicals sector is attractive to value investors because it is a capital-intensive sector that can become grossly undervalued ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. What is price variance in cost accounting?

    Price variance in cost accounting is the difference between the actual price paid by a company to purchase an item and its ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What do you need to know to create a business model?

    A business model lays out the idea for a business, along with the step-by-step plan for making the business profitable. To ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. Do any markets not exhibit asymmetric information?

    Asymmetric information, when interpreted literally, means that two parties to an economic transaction have different information ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What are the benefits of using ceteris paribus assumptions in economics?

    Most, though not all, economists rely on ceteris paribus conditions to build and test economic models. The reason they do ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Retirement

    Consumer Confidence: A Killer Statistic

    The consumer confidence is key to any market economy, so investors need to learn the measures and how to analyze them.
  2. Markets

    Consumer Spending As A Market Indicator

    What people buy and where they shop can provide valuable information about the economy.
  3. Retirement

    Are You Saving Too Much?

    "Spend now! Don't worry about retirement," say some experts. Could they possibly be right?
  4. Fundamental Analysis

    Calculating Future Value

    Future value is the value of an asset or cash at a specified date in the future that is equivalent in value to a specified sum today.
  5. Economics

    What is Deadweight Loss?

    Mainly used in economics, deadweight loss can be applied to any deficiency caused by an inefficient allocation of resources.
  6. Economics

    How to Do a Cost-Benefit Analysis

    The benefits of a given situation or business-related action are summed and then the costs associated with taking that action are subtracted.
  7. Savings

    20 Ways To Pay Less At Costco

    There are plenty of little-known Costco shopping hacks that can save you big bucks at the register, and help you avoid the notorious spending hangover.
  8. Taxes

    Corporate Tax Rates: The Highs and the Lows

    The United States is No. 2 in the world for its high corporate tax rate. There are ways around paying it, and many nations with lower rates are worse off.
  9. Stock Analysis

    Costco, Target or Walmart: Which is the Best Bet?

    These three retailers have all been long-term winners. It that likely to continue? If so, which is the best bet?
  10. Economics

    The Big Chill: What’s Wrong With The U.S. Consumer

    Based on the most recent April data, investors may, once again, be disappointed when the second-quarter gross domestic product (GDP) report comes in.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Unlevered Beta

    A type of metric that compares the risk of an unlevered company to the risk of the market. The unlevered beta is the beta ...
  2. Moving Average - MA

    A widely used indicator in technical analysis that helps smooth out price action by filtering out the “noise” from random ...
  3. Yield Curve

    A line that plots the interest rates, at a set point in time, of bonds having equal credit quality, but differing maturity ...
  4. Productivity

    An economic measure of output per unit of input. Inputs include labor and capital, while output is typically measured in ...
  5. Variance

    The spread between numbers in a data set, measuring Variance is calculated by taking the differences between each number ...
  6. Terminal Value - TV

    The value of a bond at maturity, or of an asset at a specified, future valuation date, taking into account factors such as ...
Trading Center