Average Down

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DEFINITION of 'Average Down'

The process of buying additional shares in a company at lower prices than you originally purchased. This brings the average price you've paid for all your shares down.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Average Down'

Sometimes this is a good strategy, other times it's better to sell off a beaten down stock rather than buying more shares.

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