Away From Home

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DEFINITION of 'Away From Home'

The IRS criteria used to establish whether or not you are within commuting distance from home. If you work away from home for longer than a normal workday and you require sleep, then the associated costs are tax deductible.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Away From Home'

This is used to determine whether you can deduct travel expenses such as food and lodging.

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