Away From The Market

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DEFINITION of 'Away From The Market'

An expression that is used when the bid on a limit order is lower than the current market price or the offer price is higher than the current market price, for a particular security. An away from the market order is a limit order to buy at a price lower than the current market price and an order to sell at a price higher than the current market price. The opposite of an away from the market order is an in-line order.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Away From The Market'

Away from the market limit orders are typically held for later execution, unless specified as Fill or Kill (FOK) orders. Away from the market refers to orders that are entered at a price that is not immediately available. For example, a limit order to buy 100 shares of Microsoft at $28.00 is away from the market if the stock is presently trading at $32.00 per share. Similarly, a limit order to sell 100 shares of Microsoft at $36.00 is away from the market when shares are currently trading at $32.00.

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