The Accounting Review

AAA

DEFINITION of 'The Accounting Review '

An academic publication by the American Accounting Association (AAA). First published in 1926, the journal includes abstracts, articles and book reviews that promote accounting education, research and practice. The Accounting Review is published quarterly. Areas of interest in The Accounting Review include: accounting information systems; auditing and assurance services; financial accounting; management accounting; taxation; and other areas of accounting.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'The Accounting Review '

The American Accounting Association is a voluntary organization comprised of individuals interested in accounting education and research. The editorial team selects high-quality articles for "reporting the results of accounting research and explaining and illustrating related research methodology ... The primary, but not exclusive, audience should be - as it is not - academicians, graduate students, and others interested in accounting research."

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