Back-to-Back Commitment


DEFINITION of 'Back-to-Back Commitment'

A commitment to make a second take-out loan that piggybacks another loan. With a back-to-back commitment, once the terms of the first loan are satisfied, it will be rolled into the second loan.

BREAKING DOWN 'Back-to-Back Commitment'

The best example of a back-to-back commitment is when a bank makes a construction loan to build a house. Once the house has been built and a certificate of occupancy issued, the bank will make a new loan, probably a first mortgage loan, to take out the construction loan. The bank's commitment will specify the conditions that must be met in order for the commitment to fund the second loan to be valid.

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