Back-To-Back Letters Of Credit


DEFINITION of 'Back-To-Back Letters Of Credit'

Two letters of credit (LCs) used together to help a seller finance the purchase of equipment or services from a subcontractor. With the original LC from the buyer's bank in place, the seller goes to his own bank and has a second LC issued, with the subcontractor as beneficiary. The subcontractor is thus ensured of payment upon fulfilling the terms of the contract.

BREAKING DOWN 'Back-To-Back Letters Of Credit'

Like most LCs, back-to-back LCs are used primarily in international transactions, with the first LC serving as collateral for the second.

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  1. What's the difference between a bank guarantee and a letter of credit?

    A bank guarantee and a letter of credit are similar in many ways but they're two different things. Letters of credit ensure ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. How does a bank determine what my discretionary income is when making a loan decision?

    Discretionary income is the money left over from your gross income each month after taking out taxes and paying for necessities. ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. What is the difference between "closed end credit" and a "line of credit?"

    Depending on the need, an individual or business may take out a form of credit that is either open- or closed-ended. While ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What are typical forms of long-term debt for a public company?

    Public companies fund their operational needs and capital expenditures with equity or debt. Most often, companies choose ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What net interest margin is typical for a bank?

    In the United States, the average net interest margin for banks was 3.03% in the first quarter of 2015. However, this was ... Read Full Answer >>
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    The appropriate benchmarks for tracking banking sector performance depend on the type of banking. For instance, commercial-only ... Read Full Answer >>

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