Backflush Costing


DEFINITION of 'Backflush Costing'

A product costing system generally used in a just-in-time inventory environment. Backflush costing delays the costing process until the production of goods is completed. Costs are then "flushed" back at the end of the production run and assigned to the goods. This eliminates the detailed tracking of costs throughout the production process, which is a feature of traditional costing systems.

BREAKING DOWN 'Backflush Costing'

By eliminating work-in-process accounts, backflush costing simplifies the accounting process. However, this simplification and other deviations from traditional costing systems mean that backflush costing may not always conform to generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP). Another drawback of this system is the lack of a sequential audit trail.

  1. Full Costing

    A managerial accounting method that describes when all fixed ...
  2. Make To Order - MTO

    A business production strategy that typically allows consumers ...
  3. Just In Time - JIT

    An inventory strategy companies employ to increase efficiency ...
  4. Activity-Based Costing - ABC

    An accounting method that identifies the activities that a firm ...
  5. Goods In Process

    An inventory account that is usually identified on the balance ...
  6. Encumbrance

    A claim against a property by a party that is not the owner. ...
Related Articles
  1. Investing Basics

    The Working Capital Position

    Learn how to correctly analyze a company's liquidity and beat the average investor.
  2. Fundamental Analysis

    Inventory Valuation For Investors: FIFO And LIFO

    We go over these methods of calculating this component of the balance sheet, and how the choice affects the bottom line.
  3. Investing Basics

    Understanding The Cash Conversion Cycle

    Find out how a simple calculation can help you uncover the most efficient companies.
  4. Fundamental Analysis

    Vital Link: Manufacturing And Economic Recovery

    Manufacturing output is one of the clearest signs that an economy is recovering from a recession.
  5. Professionals

    Career Advice: Accountant Vs. Financial Planner

    Identify the key differences between a career in accounting and financial planning, and learn how your personality dictates which is the better choice for you.
  6. Economics

    Calculating Days Working Capital

    A company’s days working capital ratio shows how many days it takes to convert working capital into revenue.
  7. Professionals

    Career Advice: Accountant Vs. Controller

    Learn about the differences between controllers and accountants, how the two are related and which is the best career choice for aspiring bookkeepers.
  8. Investing

    What is EBITA?

    EBITA measures a company’s full profitability before reducing it by interest, taxes and amortization considerations, and so is useful for calculating a company’s internal efficiency or profitability ...
  9. Professionals

    What is Cash Basis Accounting?

    Cash basis accounting recognizes revenues and expenses at the time cash is paid or received.
  10. Term

    What Is Financial Performance?

    Financial performance measures a firm’s ability to generate profits through the use of its assets.
  1. Does working capital include inventory?

    A company's working capital includes inventory, and increases in inventory make working capital increase. Working capital ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. Does working capital include salaries?

    A company accrues unpaid salaries on its balance sheet as part of accounts payable, which is a current liability account, ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. Are dividends considered an asset?

    Whether dividends paid on stock are considered an asset depends on which role you play in the investment: the issuing company ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What is a profit and loss (P&L) statement and why do companies publish them?

    A profit and loss (P&L) statement, or balance sheet, is essentially a snapshot of a company's financial activity for ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. How do dividends affect the balance sheet?

    Dividends paid in cash affect a company's balance sheet by decreasing the company's cash account on the asset side and decreasing ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. Who actually declares a dividend?

    It is a company's board of directors who actually declares a dividend. The declaration date is the first of four important ... Read Full Answer >>

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Term Deposit

    A deposit held at a financial institution that has a fixed term, and guarantees return of principal.
  2. Zero-Sum Game

    A situation in which one person’s gain is equivalent to another’s loss, so that the net change in wealth or benefit is zero. ...
  3. Capitalization Rate

    The rate of return on a real estate investment property based on the income that the property is expected to generate.
  4. Gross Profit

    A company's total revenue (equivalent to total sales) minus the cost of goods sold. Gross profit is the profit a company ...
  5. Revenue

    The amount of money that a company actually receives during a specific period, including discounts and deductions for returned ...
  6. Normal Profit

    An economic condition occurring when the difference between a firm’s total revenue and total cost is equal to zero.
Trading Center
You are using adblocking software

Want access to all of Investopedia? Add us to your “whitelist”
so you'll never miss a feature!